The Cure for Alcohol Addiction in Scottsdale with combination Naltrexone plus targeted specialized therapy

Traditional alcohol addiction treatment unfortunately has failed the vast majority of people and sadly there exists no legitimate option that offers success other than the methodology I have found through research and practice. The foundation of the method is utilizing a medication called Naltrexone in a manner referred to as the “Sinclair Method.)  Whether complete sobriety is your goal or whether learning to control your drinking is desired; the solution to the problem continues to elude both patients and traditional physicians. A primary reason for the lack of successful options comes down to an outdated conceptualization and propagation of the alcohol addiction illness.

Alcohol addiction undoubtedly is best conceptualized as a medical illness but all medical illnesses involve a complex interplay between genetic predisposition and factors influencing the ultimate manifestation of disease course. An illness and disease course can be altered by modifying the driving factors involved in the progression of a disease from genetically predisposed to full expression of disease symptoms. Traditional credence of alcohol addiction assumes that since alcohol addiction is a disease, one is powerless over the disease. Second, a black and white mindset involving the notion that complete sobriety remains the only way to contain the disease continues to be taught. This model of addiction fails to capture the fact the neuro-circuitry involved in addiction is a fluid piece of the puzzle. People each of the ability to strengthen addiction circuits by through their thoughts and behaviors. These conditioned behaviors strengthen the circuits involved and the disease process can evolve at a faster pace.

There is also the psychological factors which is commonly understood as “triggers.” For example deep insecurity and difficulty managing feelings of despair when presented with devaluing situations leads to psychic pain that is virtually impossible to endure. This will lead to seeking coping strategies such as the escape alcohol provides. Learning to modify one’s ability to handle certain emotions, and modify their behavior surrounding certain emotions can lead to a reversal in the very triggers that drive the need to drink.

To cure the problem, the approach must include the incorporation of both the neuro-circuitry involved in the reward system of drinking coupled with the circuitry involved in the psychological triggers driving one to drink. Naltrexone works to de-couple the reward system from being strengthened each time one drinks. This biologically reverses the long-standing conditioned behavioral component which drives the intense cravings which come with long-standing addiction. Next, targeted cognitive behavioral therapy to identify one’s main emotional weakness and thus eliminate the circuit which is strengthening the trigger to drink, is the other crucial step in overcoming the addiction.

When you implement both approaches, there is extreme synergy to the process and the disease course can be modified and controlled very effectively. This does not mean the illness is not genetically linked but the ultimate disease progression becomes highly controllable and one does have complete power over this process. With a motivated patient, this approach works within a few months to give them control back over their lives and to be in control of the alcohol; whether their goal is complete sobriety or controlled drinking.
Michael Yasinski MDTraditional alcohol addiction treatment unfortunately has fallen short of offering the vast majority of people a legitimate option to find a path forward for change.

Whether complete sobriety is your goal or whether learning to control your drinking is desired; the solution to the problem continues to elude both patients and traditional physicians. A primary reason for the lack of successful options comes down to an outdated conceptualization and propagation of the alcohol addiction illness.

Alcohol addiction undoubtedly is best conceptualized as a medical illness but all medical illnesses involve a complex interplay between genetic predisposition and factors influencing the ultimate manifestation of disease course. An illness and disease course can be altered by modifying the driving factors involved in the progression of a disease from genetically predisposed to full expression of disease symptoms. Traditional credence of alcohol addiction assumes that since alcohol addiction is a disease, one is powerless over the disease. Second, a black and white mindset involving the notion that complete sobriety remains the only way to contain the disease continues to be taught. This model of addiction fails to capture the fact the neuro-circuitry involved in addiction is a fluid piece of the puzzle. People each of the ability to strengthen addiction circuits by through their thoughts and behaviors. These conditioned behaviors strengthen the circuits involved and the disease process can evolve at a faster pace.

There is also the psychological factors which is commonly understood as “triggers.” For example deep insecurity and difficulty managing feelings of despair when presented with devaluing situations leads to psychic pain that is virtually impossible to endure. This will lead to seeking coping strategies such as the escape alcohol provides. Learning to modify one’s ability to handle certain emotions, and modify their behavior surrounding certain emotions can lead to a reversal in the very triggers that drive the need to drink.

To cure the problem, the approach must include the incorporation of both the neuro-circuitry involved in the reward system of drinking coupled with the circuitry involved in the psychological triggers driving one to drink. Naltrexone works to de-couple the reward system from being strengthened each time one drinks. This biologically reverses the long-standing conditioned behavioral component which drives the intense cravings which come with long-standing addiction. Next, targeted cognitive behavioral therapy to identify one’s main emotional weakness and thus eliminate the circuit which is strengthening the trigger to drink, is the other crucial step in overcoming the addiction.

When you implement both approaches, there is extreme synergy to the process and the disease course can be modified and controlled very effectively. This does not mean the illness is not genetically linked but the ultimate disease progression becomes highly controllable and one does have complete power over this process. With a motivated patient, this approach works within a few months to give them control back over their lives and to be in control of the alcohol; whether their goal is complete sobriety or controlled drinking.

Michael Yasinski MD